Interdisciplinary Science

Why limit yourself? Interdisciplinary Science is based more on breadth than on the depth of coverage found in most Science programs.

The program is based more on breadth than on the depth of coverage found in a traditional Bachelor of Science degree. This is the most flexible science degree program at Laurentian and students tailor it to suit their particular career goals. It is geared to students who want to obtain a science related degree but who do not necessarily intend to become working scientists. Students are advised to round out the interdisciplinary science degree by specializing in one area to ensure a well-balanced education.

Academic Advisor

Dr. Hélène Joly

Telephone: 705-675-1151, 2333

Email: hjoly@laurentian.ca

Office: S421

How to Apply
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Delivery Method: On campus/Online
Program Language: English

Program Highlights:

  • Three-year or four-year (Honours) program leads to a Bachelor of science ( Interdisciplinary)
  • Combination of courses in biology, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics and physics
  • Courses in ethics, philosophy, religious studies, environment, law, ethics, psychology and languages may also be included

Ontario High School Applicants

1 grade 12 English U/M course

5 other grade 12 U/M courses 

A minimum overall average of 70% in the 6 best grade 12 U/M courses


Additional information for applicants who have completed Advanced Placement courses.

Additional information for applicants who have completed the International Baccalaureate.

 

Applicants from outside an Ontario High School 

International Students

Canadian High School Applicants from outside Ontario

Applicants from Colleges

Applicants from other Universities

Mature Students

For Current Students

The degree options listed below are for the upcoming academic year, not the current academic year. If you are a current student looking for which courses to take in order to complete your degree options from a previous academic year's curriculum, please consult with an academic advisor.


Interdisciplinary Science (4-year) 

Bachelor of Science (Interdisciplinary) 4 year
 

The Program comprises a minimum of 72 credits in at least 3 different science subjects.  The science subjects are defined as a sequence of courses with the code BIOL, CHMI, COSC, ENSC, GEOL, MATH or PHYS.  Details are: 

a) 54 credits from two main science subjects (minimum of 18 credits each).   Each one of these two science subjects consists of 6 credits at the 1000 level, plus a minimum of 12 credits at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level.  See “Other regulations” for exceptions. 

 

b) 18 credits of other science courses, broken down as: 

6 credits from one of BIOL, CHMI, COSC, ENSC, GEOL, MATH, PHYS, other than science subjects chosen in a); 

12 credits from any of the science subjects listed above.   

Note that a minimum of 3 credits in each of MATH and COSC is required.   

- Students who do not have U-level credits in “Advanced Functions” or “Calculus and Vectors” should take MATH 1912.   

 

c) 3 credits of science communication or integration: 

SCOM 4006   Presenting and Communicating Research

or 

LIBS 4006   Science Integration

 

d) 6 credits from List A*: 

ENGL 1511   Academic Reading and Writing for Aboriginal Students I

and 

ENGL 1512   Academic Reading and Writing for Aboriginal Students II  

ENGL 1540   Reading and Writing - Native 

ENGL 1550   Academic Reading and Writing 

FREN 1050   Beginner level: Oral and written communications in French as a second language/Communication orale et écrite 

FREN 1060   Intermediate-advanced level: Mastering oral and written expression in French as a second language/ Perfectionnement 

FREN 1505   Oral and written French supported by technology/Le français oral et écrit appuyé par la technologie 

LANG 1005   Grammaire appliquée à la rédaction 

INDG 1016   Introductory Nishnaabemwin A

and 

INDG 1017   Introductory Nishnaabemwin B  

INDG 1025   Introduction to Cree  

 

e) 6 credits from List B*:  

COST 2446   The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication I 

COST 2447   The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication II 

COST 2506   Information Technology I: Theory 

COST 2507   Representations of Technology  

ENGR 4117   Engineering, Technology and Society 

HIST 3905   History of Science  

INDG 1116   Foundations of Aboriginal Peoplehood 

INDG 1117   Implications of Aboriginal Peoplehood 

INDG 2316   Foundations of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge 

INDG 2306   Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Environ. Studies 

PHIL 2345   Bioethics: Human Life Issues (co-listed as RLST 2345) 

PHIL 2217   Environmental Ethics 

PHIL 2356   Philosophie de la biologie 

PHIL 2505   Critical Thinking and Argumentation 

PHIL 2525   Contemporary Moral Issues 

PHIL 2746   Communication, media and values 

PHIL 2747   Technology, freedom and values 

PHIL 2916   Philosophy of Science 

RLST 3306   Issues in Religion and Science  

*Or 6 credits of other equivalent courses approved by the coordinator. 

 

f) 33 credits of electives 

Note that, among these elective credits, students can choose a research project or thesis course in their 4th year if they want to prepare themselves for graduate studies.  Students planning graduate studies will have to carefully plan their selection of courses and discuss with academic advisors as this may not be possible in every field.  The following courses are available, provided that they have the course prerequisites and they can find a co-supervisor: BIOL 4035, CHMI 4615, COSC 4235, COSC 4086, ENSC 4105, GEOL 4005, MATH 4005, MATH 4086, PHYS 4115. 

 

Other regulations: 

  • A science subject in Environmental Science (ENSC) consists of ENSC 1406 and ENVI 1507, plus the remainder in ENSC courses at 2000, 3000 or 4000 level.
     
  • A science subject in Mathematics consists of MATH 1036/37, 1056/57 plus the remainder at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level.  The course STAT 2246 Statistics for Scientists may count towards a MATH science subject.
     
  • Students must take at least 30 science credits at the 3000 or 4000 level.  A minimum of 24 of these credits must be in the two main declared science subjects chosen in a).
     
  • Students must have a minimum of 9 credits at the 4000 level, including LIBS 4006 or SCOM 4006, or both.
     
  • A student cannot take more than 48 credits in any one of BIOL, CHMI, COSC, ENSC, GEOL, MATH, or PHYS excluding the above mentioned research project or thesis.
     
  • Students may take a maximum of 48 credits at the first-year level.
     
  • Students must have a GPA of 3.5 in each science subject, and 3.5 overall for them to graduate.

 

Interdisciplinary Science (3 year)  (ALSO OFFERED ONLINE*)

Bachelor of Science (Interdisciplinary) 3 year


The Program comprises a minimum of 54 credits in at least 3 different science subjects.  The science subjects are defined as a sequence of courses with the code BIOL, CHMI, COSC, ENSC, GEOL, MATH or PHYS.  Details are: 

a) 36 credits from two main science subjects (minimum of 18 credits each).   Each one of these two science subjects consists of 6 credits at the 1000 level, plus a minimum of 12 credits at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level.  See “Other regulations” for exceptions. 

 

b) 18 credits of other science courses, broken down as: 

6 credits from one of BIOL, CHMI, COSC, ENSC, GEOL, MATH, PHYS, other than science subjects chosen in a); 

12 credits from any of the science subjects listed above.   

Note that a minimum of 3 credits in each of MATH and COSC is required.   

  • Students who do not have U-level credits in “Advanced Functions” or “Calculus and Vectors” should take MATH 1912.   

 

c) 6 credits from this list (List A)*: 

ENGL 1511   Academic Reading and Writing for Aboriginal Students I

and 

ENGL 1512   Academic Reading and Writing for Aboriginal Students II

ENGL 1540   Reading and Writing - Native 

ENGL 1550   Academic Reading and Writing 

FREN 1050   Beginner level: Oral and written communications in French as a second language/Communication orale et écrite 

FREN 1060   Intermediate-advanced level: Mastering oral and written expression in French as a second language/ Perfectionnement 

FREN 1505   Oral and written French supported by technology/Le français oral et écrit appuyé par la technologie 

LANG 1005   Grammaire appliquée à la rédaction 

INDG 1016   Introductory Nishnaabemwin A

and 

INDG 1017   Introductory Nishnaabemwin B 

INDG 1025   Introduction to Cree  

 

d) 6 credits from this list (List B)*:  

COST 2446   The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication I 

COST 2447   The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication II 

COST 2506   Information Technology I: Theory 

COST 2507   Representations of Technology  

ENGR 4117   Engineering, Technology and Society 

HIST 3905   History of Science  

INDG 1116   Foundations of Aboriginal Peoplehood 

INDG 1117   Implications of Aboriginal Peoplehood 

INDG 2316   Foundations of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge 

INDG 2306   Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Environ. Studies 

PHIL 2345   Bioethics: Human Life Issues (co-listed as RLST 2345) 

PHIL 2216   Environmental Ethics 

PHIL 2356   Philosophie de la biologie 

PHIL 2505   Critical Thinking and Argumentation 

PHIL 2525   Contemporary Moral Issues 

PHIL 2746   Communication, media and values 

PHIL 2747   Technology, freedom and values 

PHIL 2916   Philosophy of Science 

RLST 3306   Issues in Religion and Science  

*Or 6 credits of other equivalent courses approved by the coordinator. 

 

e) 24 credits of electives 

*Online option offering main sujects only in Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics)

 

Other regulations: 

  • A science subject in Environmental science (ENSC) consists of ENSC 1406 and ENVI 1507, plus the remainder in ENSC courses at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level.
     
  • A science subject in Mathematics consists of MATH 1036/37, 1056/57 plus the remainder at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level.  The course STAT 2246 Statistics for Scientists may count towards a MATH science subject.
     
  • Students must take at least 3 science credits at the 3000 or 4000 level from one of the two main science subjects selected in a) above.
     
  • Students may take a maximum of 48 credits at the first-year level.
     
  • Students must have a GPA of 3.5 in each science subject, and 3.5 overall to graduate.

First-year courses

Students must take 6 credits from 3 of the science disciplines below (for a total of 18 credits in 3 science disciplines), plus up to 12 credits of electives. *Note that students are required to take a minimum of 3 credits of Math and 3 credits of Computer Science.

On-campus: BIOL, CHMI, GEOL, and PHYS courses require labs.

Alternate BIOL, CHMI, COSC, GEOL, and PHYS courses are available to students who do not have high school prerequisites or to those taking the online degree. Consult the coordinator.

Year:

BIOL-1506EL - Biology I BIOL-1507EL - Biology II CHMI-1006EL - General Chemistry I CHMI-1007EL - General Chemistry II COSC-1046EL - Computer Science 1 COSC-1047EL - Computer Science II COSC-1701EL - Computer Applications COSC-1702EL - Computer Applications II ENSC-1406EL - Earth's Environmental Systems ENVI-1507EL - Introduction to Environmental Studies GEOL-1006EL - Introductory Geology I
GEOL-1007EL - Introductory Geology II MATH-1036EL - Calculus I MATH-1037EL - Calculus II MATH-1056EL - Discrete Mathematics I MATH-1057EL - Linear Algebra I PHYS-1006EL - Introductory Physics I PHYS-1007EL - Introductory Physics II PHYS-1206EL - Physics for the Life Science I PHYS-1207EL - Physics for the Life Science II LIBS-4006EL - Science Integration
Hélène Joly

Hélène Joly

Faculty of Science, Engineering and Architecture