Geography

Navigate your way to a great career.

Students will understand the theory inherent in the key areas of physical and human geographic study and will also be exposed to the actual real-life application.

The techniques courses collectively represent the discipline-specific skill set that geographers need to possess. As such, students will gain expertise in statistics, cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), air photo and remote sensing interpretation, and geographic research and methodological approaches. These are the tools that geographers use to analyze various geographic phenomena that are more specifically developed in physical and human courses or more broadly assessed in regional geography classes.

Every effort is made to keep the student current in terms of using modern approaches with leading technologies, but ‘tried and true’ methodologies are also demonstrated. So that students maintain a world view, regional courses are also offered for various locations including: Canada, the United States, the European Union, the Pacific Rim, Africa and Latin America. Studies of physical spatial processes (physical geography) or human distribution and interaction over space (human geography) are introduced in the first year with two introductory level systematic courses. A specific subset of physical, human and techniques courses constitute core courses in the curriculum and provide the foundation for more advanced courses. Students will normally finish their core courses throughout years two and three. With the knowledge attained via these core courses, students are ready for more advanced classes. As such, it is normal for a student to gravitate towards either a more human or physical geography emphasis and/or pursue more advanced theoretical or technique-oriented studies in their fourth year (which may also include advanced directed studies or thesis).

Academic Advisor

Dr. Stephen Meyer

Telephone: 705-675-1151 Ext. 3431

Email: smeyer@laurentian.ca

Office: P326 Parker Building

How to Apply
By land area, Greater Sudbury is the largest city in Ontario and as such, the great outdoors beckon with its vast expanse of lakes and waterways, varied terrain, forests and comprehensive network of trails.

A degree will be awarded to students who demonstrate proficiency within three geographic paradigms (physical, human and geographic technique courses), and the ability to carry out the advanced geographic study at the third (3000) and, particularly, fourth year (4000) level. Examples on the physical side include courses in geomorphology, biogeography, hydrology and climatology; whereas human geographic courses emphasize cultural/population geography, political geography, economic geography and urban geography. Geographic techniques courses include geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, cartography, air photo interpretation and spatial statistics.

Program Highlights:

While our faculty members are successful researchers with many publications, teaching and administering outstanding courses remains the top priority.

In addition:

  • Students have access to a computer lab with current spatial software packages and a map library.

  • Students will study not only the physical features of the land, but also the structure of cities, global economies and markets, as well as political climates and changes around the globe.

  • Students learn to understand the complexity and interrelationships between the human and natural environments.

  • Students will have opportunities to travel; previous trips have been to Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, Pickering and Toronto, United States, Cuba, Mexico, Dakar (Africa), China, Jamaica and so on.

 

While not everything is geography, nearly anything can be analyzed in a geographical way. Geographers analyze phenomena over space and as such are particularly skilled in seeing spatial relationships in the physical environment, the human domain and/or with respect to human-physical environmental interactions. Geographers are well equipped for the modern information age. We can contribute to the collection of ‘big data’, but more importantly we have the ability to analyze spatial datasets and make sense of trends. Whether it is gauging environmental change, comparing human health outcomes over space or making policy to improve the overall human condition, geographers are trained to make sense of patterns and assess various disparities and differences over space.

Ontario High School Applicants

1 grade 12 English U/M course

5 other grade 12 U/M courses 

A minimum overall average of 70% in the 6 best grade 12 U/M courses


Additional information for applicants who have completed Advanced Placement courses.

Additional information for applicants who have completed the International Baccalaureate.

 

Applicants from outside an Ontario High School 

International Students

Canadian High School Applicants from outside Ontario

Applicants from Colleges

Applicants from other Universities

Mature Students

Credit transfer opportunities are available from other recognized postsecondary institutions and are typically evaluated on an individual basis. Some fast-tracking opportunities also exist.

For Current Students

The degree options listed below are for the upcoming academic year, not the current academic year. If you are a current student looking for which courses to take in order to complete your degree options from a previous academic year's curriculum, please consult with an academic advisor.


Bachelor of Arts (3 Year) in Geography

Total 90 credits

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

Concentration in Geography

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

Although the requirements have been slotted in first year in the description below, students may fulfill them at any time during their studies.

Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

Courses fulfilling these requirements may be taken as electives or as part of a minor, concentration, major or specialization. 

First Year

   GEOG 1026E       Introduction to Physical Geography
   GEOG 1027E       Introduction to Human Geography
   6 elective credits of linguistic awareness (see regulations)
   6 elective credits in the Sciences
   6 elective credits in Indigenous content (starting 2017)
   6 elective credits

 

Upper Years

   9 credits in Geographic Techniques courses from the following:

                STAT 2126E         Introduction to Statistics

                GEOG 2016E       Introduction to Cartography

                GEOG 2017E       Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

                GEOG 2037E       Introduction to Remote Sensing

                OR one of:

                                GEOG 2027E       Quantitative Methods in Geography OR

                                ECON 2136E        Statistical Methods for Economics OR

                                PSYC 2127E         Scientific Method and Analysis II OR

                                SOCI 2127E          Research Methods and Data Analysis

   6 credits in Physical Geography courses from the following:

                GEOG 2106E       Geomorphology I or GEOL 1006E or GEOL 1021E

                GEOG 2126E       Climatology I

                GEOG 2136E       Introduction to Hydrology           

                GEOG 2147E       Biogeography I or BIOL 2356E Principles of Ecology

   6 credits in Human Geography courses from the following:

                GEOG 2216E       Cultural Geography or    ANTR 2046E

                GEOG 2236E       Geographic Perspectives on Urban Systems

                GEOG 2246E       Political Geography: Canadian Issues

                GEOG 2247E       Economic Geography: Canadian Issues

   9 credits from GEOG 3000 or 4000 level courses

                - may also include:

                                ECON 2027E        Introduction to Regional Economics

                                HIST 3066E          Cities in Canada

                                POLI 2306E          International Relations

                                POLI 3316           Regional Governance/Euro Union

   30 elective credits

Note:    Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

 

Bachelor of Arts (4 Year) in Geography

Total 120 credits

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

Specialization in Geography

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

Although the requirements have been slotted in first year in the description below, students may fulfill them at any time during their studies.

Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

Courses fulfilling these requirements may be taken as electives or as part of a minor, concentration, major or specialization. 

First Year

   GEOG 1026E       Introduction to Physical Geography
   GEOG 1027E       Introduction to Human Geography
   6 elective credits of linguistic awareness (see regulations)
   6 elective credits in the Sciences
   6 elective credits in Indigenous content (starting 2017)
   6 elective credits

Upper Years

   STAT 2126E         Introduction to Statistics

   6 credits in Geographic Techniques courses from the following:

                GEOG 2016E       Introduction to Cartography

                GEOG 2017E       Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

                GEOG 2037E       Introduction to Remote Sensing

                OR one of:

                                GEOG 2027E       Quantitative Methods in Geography OR

                                ECON 2136E        Statistical Methods for Economics OR

                                PSYC 2127E         Scientific Method and Analysis II OR

                                SOCI 2127E          Research Methods and Data Analysis

   9 credits in Physical Geography courses from the following:

                GEOG 2106E       Geomorphology I or GEOL 1006E or GEOL 1021E

                GEOG 2126E       Climatology I

                GEOG 2136E       Introduction to Hydrology           

                GEOG 2147E       Biogeography I or BIOL 2356E Principles of Ecology

   9 credits in Human Geography courses from the following:

                GEOG 2216E       Cultural Geography or ANTR 2046E

                GEOG 2236E       Geographic Perspectives on Urban Systems

                GEOG 2246E       Political Geography: Canadian Issues

                GEOG 2247E       Economic Geography: Canadian Issues

   12 credits from GEOG 4000 level courses

   15 credits from GEOG 3000 or 4000 level courses

                - may also include:

                               ECON 2027E        Introduction to Regional Economics

                               HIST 3066E          Cities in Canada

                               POLI 2306E          International Relations

                               POLI 3316E           Regional Governance/Euro Union

   36 elective credits

Note:    Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

 

Major in Geography

   GEOG 1026E       Introduction to Physical Geography

   GEOG 1027E       Introduction to Human Geography

   9 credits in Geographic Techniques courses from the following:

                STAT 2126E         Introduction to Statistics

                GEOG 2016E       Introduction to Cartography

                GEOG 2017E       Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

                GEOG 2037E       Introduction to Remote Sensing

                OR one of:

                                GEOG 2027E       Quantitative Methods in Geography OR

                                ECON 2136E        Statistical Methods for Economics OR

                                PSYC 2127E         Scientific Method and Analysis II OR

                                SOCI 2127E          Research Methods and Data Analysis

   6 credits in Physical Geography courses from the following:

                GEOG 2106E       Geomorphology I or GEOL 1006E   or GEOL 1021E

                GEOG 2126E       Climatology I

                GEOG 2136E       Introduction to Hydrology           

                GEOG 2147E       Biogeography I or BIOL 2356E Principles of Ecology

   6 credits in Human Geography courses from the following:

                GEOG 2216E       Cultural Geography or ANTR 2046E

                GEOG 2236E       Geographic Perspectives on Urban Systems

                GEOG 2246E       Political Geography: Canadian Issues

                GEOG 2247E       Economic Geography: Canadian Issues

   9 credits from GEOG 4000 level courses

   6 credits from GEOG 3000 or 4000 level courses

                - may also include:

                                ECON 2027E        Introduction to Regional Economics

                                HIST 3066E          Cities in Canada

                                POLI 2306E          International Relations

                                POLI 3316E          Regional Governance/Euro Union

   78 elective credits#

Notes:

  • Students must include 6 credits in linguistic awareness, 6 credits of Indigenous content, and 6 credits in the Sciences if not part of the other minor or second major. Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.
  • Students must complete a minimum of a minor (24 credits) or a second major (42 credits) from among their elective credits.
  • Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

 

Minor in Geography

24 credits in Geography of which at least 6 credits must be at the 3000 or 4000 level

 

Minor in Community Leadership

Required (3 cr):

ANTR 2206E  Foundations of Community Leadership

 

  1. Community Leadership Foundations (6 credits)

    6 credits from the following list:

     ANTR 1007E  Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology

     ANTR 2126E  Anthropology and the World Today

     ECON 1006E  Introduction to Microeconomics

     ECON 1007E  Introduction to Macroeconomics

     ENVI 1507E  Introduction to Environmental Studies

     INDG 1116E  Foundations of Aboriginal Peoplehood

     LBST 2246E  What Do Unions Do?

     MGMT 1006E  Foundations of the Management of Organizations I

     MGMT 1007E  Foundations of the Management of Organizations II

     SOCI 1015E  Understanding Society

 

     II.  Communication and Advocacy (3 credits)

     3 credits from the following list:

     ANTR 2136E  Workplace Culture

     ANTR 3216E  Visual Ethnography

     COST 1117E  Introduction to Communication Theory and Semiotics

     COST 2246E  The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication I

     COST 2247E  The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication II

     COST 2526E  New Culture

     ENGL 2016E  Science Writing in the Public Sphere

     ENGL 2546E  Rhetorical Principles

     ENGL 3556E  Principles and Practices of Workplace Communication

     ENGL/FILM 2846E  Rhetoric of Film and Image

     ENGL 3536E  Environmental Communication

     LBST 3246E  Workplace Rights Advocacy

     SCOM 4006E  Presenting and Communicating Research

     THEA 2127E  Voice I

 

     III.  Social Justice and Change (3 credits)

     3 credits from the following list:

     ANTR 2106E  Cultural Dynamics and Change

     ENVI 2516E  Ecological Footprints and Demographic Change

     INDG 2136E  Aboriginal Political Resistance in Canada: An Integrated Media Analysis

     ISWK 1006E  Introduction to Indigenous Social Welfare

     PHIL 2876E  Business Ethics

     POLI 2426E  Individual, Community and Political Order

     SOCI 2656E  Social Inequality: Gender, Race, Class and Power

     SWLF 1006E  Introduction to Social Welfare

 

     IV.  Socioeconomic Foundations (6 credits):

     6 credits from the following list:

     ANTR 3047E  Public Health and Epidemiology

     ANTR 3086E  Medical Anthropology: Medicine, Culture and Society

     ECON 2026E  Introduction to Urban Economics

     ECON 2027E  Introduction to Regional Economics

     GEOG 2247E  Economic Geography: Canadian Issues

     HIST 3276E  History of Northern Ontario

     INDG 3116E  Aboriginal People and the Criminal Justice System

     ISWK 2006E  Indigenous Social Welfare Issues

     SOCI 2306E  Introduction to Globalization/POLI 2306E  International Relations

     SWLF 2106E  Political Economy of Social Welfare

     WGSX 2036E  Gender, Work and Families

 

V.  Research and Applications (3 credits):

     3 credits from the following list:

     ANTR 4086E  Applied Anthropology

     COST 3127E  Communication Research

     ENVI 3506E  The Living City

     ENVI 3516E  Greening the Built Environment

     GEOG 2017E  Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

     INDG 3117E  Social Policy and Family Law with Native People

     ISWK 2007E  Applied Indigenous Social Work Issues

     ISWK 4416E  Conflict Resolution and Peace-Masking in Indigenous Social Work Practice

     LBST 2106E  Occupational Health and Safety, Level I

     LBST 3056E  Collective Bargaining 

     SOCI 2127E  Research Methods and Data Analysis

 

Certificate in Geographic Techniques

Applied geographers use geographical knowledge and skills to form solutions to spatial problems.  The courses that constitute the Certificate in Geographic Techniques provide students with both relevant training and general education.  The certificate equips the student with marketable skills by providing a solid background in: cartography, quantitative methods, air photo interpretation, remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS).  These courses demonstrate how spatially-referenced information can be manipulation to tackle a wide range of location-allocation problems.  Knowledge of these skills can result in numerous public and private sector employment opportunities including: resource management, natural environment conservation, regional/urban land use planning and marketing analysis.

The courses required in this certificate are all inherently linked.  The introductory courses provide the fundamentals of geographic inquiry.  The cartography and quantitative methods courses give the student background in the use of statistics and computer-assisted mapping techniques.  Air-photo interpretation and remote sensing likewise provide the student with additional spatial analytical skills.  The GIS courses expand upon the spatial knowledge already learned and show how the use of geographic information systems can be used to assist in solving many contemporary problems in a wide variety of fields.

The requirements of the Certificate in Geographic Techniques are as follows:

Students must complete the following with a minimum overall average of 70% in these 30 credits.

24 credits from the following:

                GEOG 1026E       Introduction to Physical Geography

                GEOG 1027E       Introduction to Human Geography

                GEOG 2016E       Introduction to Cartography

                GEOG 2017E       Applied Cartography/Intro to Geographic Information Systems

                STAT 2126E         Introduction to Statistics

                GEOG 2027E       Quantitative Methods in Geography

                GEOG 2037E       Introduction to Remote Sensing

                GEOG 3036E       Air Photo Interpretation

                GEOG 3046E       History and Methodology of Geography

                GEOG 3056E       Topics in Geographic Information Systems Application

                GEOG 4057E       Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Systems/Spatial Analysis

6 additional GEOG credits

 

Certificate in Social Research Methods (30 credits)
If your concentration, major or speciaIization is in the Social sciences, you can obtain a BA and a Certificate in Social Research without any additional courses
I. STATISTICS (3 credits required) One of the following:
      STAT 2126EL Introduction to Statistics
      ECON 2136EL Statistical Methods for Economics
      STAT 1056EL Business Statistics
      STAT 2246EL Statistics for Scientists
II. MATHEMATICS (3 credits required) One of the following:
      ECON 2127EL Introduction to the Mathematical Treatment of Economics
      MATH 1911EL Finite Mathematics
      MATH 1912EL Elementary Calculus
      MATH 1057EL Linear Algebra I
      MATH 1036EL Calculus I
III. QUANTITATIVE METHODS ( 9 credits required)
      ECON 3466EL Introduction to Econometrics
      ECON 3476EL Mathematical Economics I
      PSYC 2127EL Scientific Method and Analysis II
      PSYC 3156EL Basic Research Practicum
      PSYC 3256EL Design and Analysis I
      GERO 3126EL Applied Research Methods in Gerontology I
      GERO 3127EL Applied Research Methods in Gerontology II
      SOCI 3005EL Survey Research: A Course in Applied Sociology
      SOCI 4026EL Quantitative Methods
IV. QUALITATIVE METHODS (6 credits required)
      SOCI 2127EL Research Methods and Data Analysis
      SOCI 3126EL Qualitative Methods
      INDG 3215EL Native Community-Based Research Methods
      ISWK 3555EL Indigenous Social Work Research Methodologies
      HIST 2026EL Historical Methods
      WOMN 2016EL Production of Knowledge
      ANTR 3026EL Anthropological Research: Project Design
      ENVI 4695EL Environmental Community Research
V. SPATIAL METHODS (6 credits required)
      GEOG 2017EL Applied Cartography and Introduction to GIS
      GEOG 2037EL Introduction to Remote Sensing
      GEOG 3056EL Topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Application
      GEOG 4057EL Senior Topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Spatial Analysis
VI. PRESENTATION AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS (3 credits required)
      SCOM 4006EL Presenting and Communicating Research
Prerequisites for the Certificate:
      SOCI 1015EL or PSYC 1105EL
      ECON 1006/1007EL

Note : A minimum of 6 credits of the selected courses must be at the 3000-level or above.

 

Certificate in Community Leadership (30 credits)

Required (3 credits):

ANTR 2206E  Foundations of Community Leadership

I. Community Leadership Foundations (9 credits):

     ANTR 1007E  Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology

     ANTR 2126E  Anthropology and the World Today

     ECON 1006E  Introduction to Microeconomics

     ECON 1007E  Introduction to Macroeconomics

     ENVI 1507E  Introduction to Environmental Studies

     INDG 1116E  Foundations of Aboriginal Peoplehood

     LBST 2246E  What Do Unions Do?

     MGMT 1006E  Foundations of the Management of Organizations I

     MGMT 1007E  Foundations of the Management of Organizations II

     SOCI 1015E  Understanding Society

     WGSX 1005E  Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

     WGSX 2066E  Introduction to Critical Sexuality Studies

II.  Communication and Advocacy (3 credits):

     ANTR 2136E  Workplace Culture

     ANTR 3216E  Visual Ethnography

     ARCL 3207E  Indigenous and Collaborative Archaeology

     COST 1117E  Introduction to Communication Theory and Semiotics

     COST 2246E  The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication I

     COST 2247E  The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication II

     COST 2526E  New Culture

     ENGL 2016E  Science Writing in the Public Sphere

     ENGL 2546E  Rhetorical Principles

     ENGL 3556E  Principles and Practices of Workplace Communication

     ENGL/FILM 2846E  Rhetoric of Film and Image

     ENGL 3536E  Environmental Communication

     LBST 3246E  Workplace Rights Advocacy

     PSYC 4066E  Culture and Psychology

     SCOM 4006E  Presenting and Communicating Research

     THEA 2127E  Voice I

     WGSX 3316E  Women's Activism, Global and Local

III.  Social Justice and Change (6 credits):

     ANTR 2106E  Cultural Dynamics and Change

     ENVI 2507F  Empreinte écologique et développement durable

    ENVI 2516E  Ecological Footprints and Demographic Change

    HIST 3416E  Protest and Political Change

     INDG 2136E  Aboriginal Political Resistance in Canada: An Integrated Media Analysis

     ISWK 1006E  Introduction to Indigenous Social Welfare

     PHIL 2876E  Business Ethics

     POLI 2426E  Individual, Community and Political Order

     SOCI 2656E  Social Inequality: Gender, Race, Class and Power

     SWLF 1006E  Introduction to Social Welfare

     WGSX 2046  Gender, Race and Racism

IV.  Socioeconomic Foundations (6 credits):

     ANTR 3047E  Public Health and Epidemiology

     ANTR 3086E  Medical Anthropology: Medicine, Culture and Society

     ECON 2026E  Introduction to Urban Economics

     ECON 2027E  Introduction to Regional Economics

     GEOG 2247E  Economic Geography: Canadian Issues

     HIST 3276E  History of Northern Ontario

     INDG 3116E  Aboriginal People and the Criminal Justice System

     ISWK 2006E  Indigenous Social Welfare Issues

     SOCI 2306E  Introduction to Globalization/POLI 2306E  International Relations

     SWLF 2106E  Political Economy of Social Welfare

     WGSX 2036E  Gender, Work and Families

V.  Research and Applications (3 credits):

     ANTR 4086E  Applied Anthropology

     COST 3127E  Communication Research

     ENVI 3506E  The Living City

     ENVI 3516E  Greening the Built Environment

     GEOG 2017E  Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

     INDG 3117E  Social Policy and Family Law with Native People

     ISWK 2007E  Applied Indigenous Social Work Issues

     ISWK 4416E  Conflict Resolution and Peace-Masking in Indigenous Social Work Practice

     LBST 2106E  Occupational Health and Safety, Level I

     LBST 3056E  Collective Bargaining 

     SOCI 2127E  Research Methods and Data Analysis

     STAT 2126E  Introduction to Statistics

     WGSX 2016E  The Production of Knowledge

 

 

empty

Year:

GEOG-1026EL - Introduction to Physical Geography GEOG-1027EL - Introduction to Human Geography GEOG-2016EL - Introduction to Cartography GEOG-2017EL - Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems GEOG-2027EL - Quantitative Methods in Geography GEOG-2037EL - Introduction to Remote Sensing GEOG-2106EL - Geomorphology I GEOG-2126EL - Climatology I GEOG-2136EL - Introduction to Hydrology GEOG-2147EL - Biogeography I GEOG-2216EL - Cutural Geography GEOG-2236EL - Geographic Perspectives on Urban Systems GEOG-2246EL - Political Geography: Canadian Issues GEOG-2247EL - Economic Geography: Canadian Issues GEOG-3036EL - Air Photo Interpretation GEOG-3046EL - History and Methodology of Geography GEOG-3056EL - Topics in Geographic Information Systems Application GEOG-3107EL - Geomorphology II GEOG-3126EL - Climatology II GEOG-3147EL - Biogeography II GEOG-3156EL - Climate and Global Change I GEOG-3196EL - Selected Topics in Physical Geography
GEOG-3237EL - The Internal Structure of the City GEOG-3266EL - The Spatial Organization of Economic Activity GEOG-3267EL - Comtemporary Issues in Economic Geography GEOG-3297EL - Selected Topics in Human Geography GEOG-3496EL - Geography of Northern Canada: Social and Political Perspectives GEOG-3497EL - Geography of Northern Canada: Developmental Issues GEOG-3506EL - American Landscapes GEOG-3606EL - The European Union GEOG-3826EL - Brazil and South America GEOG-3827EL - Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean GEOG-4057EL - Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Spatial Analysis GEOG-4107EL - Land Resources and Their Evaluation GEOG-4117EL - Water Issues of the 21st Century GEOG-4157EL - Climate and Global Change II GEOG-4216EL - World Population Growth GEOG-4217EL - Population and Development GEOG-4236EL - Urban Land Use Planning Theory GEOG-4237EL - Land Use Planning in Canada GEOG-4256EL - Permafrost GEOG-4985EL - Directed Studies GEOG-4995EL - Honours Thesis

~~Sessionals

Baptista, Christine      cbaptista@laurentian.ca
GEOG 2147 E – Biogeography I
GEOG 3147 E  - Biogeography II

Cook, Susan   -   SM_Cook@laurentian.ca
GEOG 2037 E – Introduction to Remote Sensing
GEOG 3036 E –  Air Photo Interpretation
GEOG 4117 E -  Water Issues in the XX1st Century

Heffernan, Sue   -   SHeffernan@laurentian.ca
GEOG 2236 E – Geography Perspectives Urban System
GEOG 3496 E -  Geography of Northern Canada: Social and Political Perspective
GEOG 3497 E -  Geography of Northern Canada: Developmental Issues

Islam, S.M. Tariqul  -   SY_Islam@laurentian.ca
GEOG 3046 E – Hitory and Methodology of Geography
GEOG 4216 E – Population and development

Kaufman, Steve   -  SKaufman@laurentian.ca
GEOG 2136 E – Introduction to Hydrology

Landry, Edouard  –   EX_Landry@laurentian.ca
GEOG 4236 E –  Urban Land Use Planning Theory
GEOG 4237 E –  Urban Land Use Planning in Canada

Leach,Marc  –  MB_Leach@laurentian.ca
GEOG 2126 E -  Climatoloy I
GEOG 2216 E – Cultural Geography

Naeem, Rahat  –  RNaeem@laurentian.ca
GEOG 1026 E – Introduction to Human Geography
GEOG 2016 E -  Introduction to Cartography
GEOG 2017 E – Applied Cartography and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Raoul Étongué-Mayer

School of Northern and Community Studies

Darrel Manitowabi

School of Northern and Community Studies

Stephen Meyer

School of Northern and Community Studies

Pascale Roy-Léveillée

School of Northern and Community Studies

Moustapha Soumahoro

School of Northern and Community Studies

Jorge Virchez

School of Northern and Community Studies