Indigenous Faculty Members


Map created by Geography student Mélanie Ferron. 

INDIGENOUS FACULTY MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY OF ARTS

Dr. Mary Ann CORBIERE (INDG) is an assistant professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies at the University of Sudbury. She holds a B.Sc. from York University, an M.B.A. from Laurentian University and a Ph.D. in Theory and Policy Studies in Education from the University of Toronto. Her main research project is a dictionary of Nishnaabemwin, her mother tongue. She is a member of Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation.
Dr. Michelle COUPAL (ENGL), assistant professor, holds a position in Aboriginal Rhetorics and Literatures in Canada in the Department of English. She earned her Ph.D. from Western University in 2013. She has developed courses on media representations of Indigeneity and the rhetoric of apology in Canada. She is working on a book entitled Literature as Testimony: Indian Residential School Fictions in Canada which will be published by Wilfrid Laurier University Press. She is French/Algonquin and a member of Bonnechere Algonquin First Nation.
Charles DAVIAU (LBST/ECON), master lecturer, is director of the School of Northern and Community Studies. He holds a B.Ed. from Nipissing University, an M.A. in Economics from the University of Guelph, and is completing his Ph.D. in Human Studies at Laurentian University. He currently teaches Labour Studies and Economics. His family background is Huron/Wendat (Bear clan). He previously taught in the communities of Sagamok Anishnawbek, Atikameksheng Anishnawbek and Serpent River First Nation.
Dr. Emily FARIES (INDG) is an assistant professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies at the University of Sudbury. She holds a B.A. and B.Ed. from Laurentian University and an M.Ed. and D.Ed. in Curriculum from the University of Toronto. Her research interests are in First Nations education and Indigenous community-based research methods. She is Associate Director of the Poverty, Homelessness and Migration research project. A member of Moose Cree First Nation in the James Bay region, she was a recipient of the National Aboriginal Achievement Award in 1998. She was awarded the President's Medal for exceptional service to the University of Sudbury in 2015. 
Dr. Michael HANKARD (INDG) is an assistant professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies at the University of Sudbury. He holds an M.A. from Georgetown University, an M.Sc. from Northeastern University and a Ph.D. in Human Studies from  Laurentian University. His research interests are in Indigenous Ecological Knowledge and traditional healing. He is Abenaki (beaver clan) and lives on Serpent River First Nation.
Brittany LUBY (HIST), lecturer, holds a tenure-track position in North American Indigenous History in the Department of History. She is completing a SSHRC-funded Ph.D. in History at York University. Her dissertation is entitled “Nizaabaawe/Drowned: Anishinabek Economies and Activism during the Post-War Hydroelectric Boom, 1950 – 1975”. She is Anishinaabe-kwe from the Treaty #3 District and grew up in Kenora, Ontario. Her family originates from Dalles 38C Indian Reserve (Ochiichagwe’Babigo’Ining Ojibway Nation).
Dr. Darrel MANITOWABI (ANTR), associate professor, holds a position in Anthropology (Aboriginal Health) in the School of Northern and Community Studies. He is coordinator of the new Masters in Indigenous Relations (MIRE) and teaches in the Ph.D. in Rural and Northern Health (IRNH). His Ph.D. thesis examined the impact of Rama First Nation’s casino on community wellness. He taught previously in the Department of Indigenous Studies (University of Sudbury) and the School of Indigenous Relations. He is a member of the Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation.
Celeste PEDRI-SPADE (ANTR), lecturer, holds a tenure-track position in Development Anthropology in the School of Northern and Community Studies. She is completing a SSHRC-funded Ph.D. in Visual Anthropology at the University of Victoria. Her research interest is in the role of art and other traditional creative and performative practices in decolonization processes. She is a practicing Anishinabekwe artist, beader and regalia maker and a member of Niizatikoong (Lac Des Mille Lacs) First Nation in northwestern Ontario.
Dr. Pierrot ROSS-TREMBLAY (SOCI) is an assistant professor in the Sociology of Development with a focus on francophone, Métis and First Nation communities. He holds a law degree (LL.B) from Laval University, a Masters in Conflict Studies from the University of Ottawa and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Essex. He is directing the work of a research team for a SSHRC-funded project on États et cultures juridiques autochtones : Un droit en quête de légitimité. He published a collection of poetry in Exit – Revue de poésie (2010). Fluent in French, English and Spanish, he is a member of the Essipiunnuat First Nation in Quebec.
Dr. Pascale ROY-LÉVEILLÉE (GEOG) is an assistant professor of Physical Geography in the School of Northern and Community Studies. Her NSERC-funded Ph.D. research focused on the vulnerablity of lakes and permafrost to climatic change in the traditional territory of the Vuntut Gwitchin, northern Yukon. As a Weskarini Algonquin Métis (Trois-Rivières), she is keen to support Indigenous people in the acquisition of technical expertise for environmental monitoring and management in the context of a changing climate.
Gregory SCOFIELD (ENGL) is an assistant professor of Creative Writing in the Department of English. He is a Métis poet, well-known in the field of Canadian literature for works such as Louis: The Heretic Poems (2011), Kipocihkân: Poems New and Selected (2009), and Singing Home the Bones (2005). A speaker of Cree, he incorporates the Cree language into his poetry. He has held Writer in Residence positions at Memorial University, the University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg.