You are now in the main content area

Courses

Research & Experience Led Learning Opportunities

Department of English
Please see the course catalogue below for a complete listing of the Department's courses.

Click a course title below for its description.

ENGL 1511 - Academic Reading and Writing in English for Aboriginal Students I
ENGL 1512 - Academic Reading and Writing in English for Aboriginal Students II
ENGL 1540 - Academic Reading and Writing for Native English Speakers
ENGL 1550 - Academic Reading and Writing for Non-Native English Speakers

ENGL 1561 - Business Communication
ENGL 1705 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies
ENGL 1706 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies I
ENGL 1707 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies II

ENGL 1717 - Intro to Creative Writing
ENGL 2005 - Literatures in English
ENGL 2016 - Science Writing in the Public Sphere
ENGL 2546 - Rhetorical Principles
ENGL 2626 - Critical Approaches
ENGL 2636 - Detective Fiction
ENGL 2637 - Children's Literature
ENGL 2646 - The Study and Evolution of the English Language
​ENGL 2656 - Northern Ontario Literature
ENGL 2666 - Literature and the Environment
ENGL 2676 - Popular Literature and Culture I
ENGL 2677 - Popular Literature and Culture II

ENGL 2815 - World Cinema

ENGL 2826 - Rhetoric of Documentary Films
ENGL 2827 - Documentary Film Making
ENGL 2846 - Rhetoric of Film and Image
ENGL 3106 – Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose
ENGL 3107 – Seventeenth-Century Poetry and Prose

ENGL 3126 – Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 3127 – Shakespeare in Context
ENGL 3157 - Women's Writing in the 16th and 17th Century
ENGL 3175 - Medieval and Early Modern Drama
ENGL 3195 - Selected Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
ENGL 3196 - Core Seminar Group 1
ENGL 3206 - The 18th Century English Novel
ENGL 3215 - English Literature of the Romantic Period
ENGL 3235 - Victorian Literature
ENGL 3246 – Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENGL 3247 – Literature of Sensibility and Revolution
ENGL 3256 - Women of Letters in the 18th Century
ENGL 3296 - Core Seminar Group 2
ENGL 3305 - Postcolonial Literary Studies
ENGL 3326 - The Modern Novel
ENGL 3327 - The Contemporary Novel
ENGL 3335 - Modern and Contemporary Poetry
ENGL 3346 - Modern Women's Writing
ENGL 3347 - Contemporary Women's Writing
ENGL 3396 - Core Seminar Group 3
ENGL 3411 – Canadian Indigenous Poetics
ENGL 3416 - American Thought and Culture
ENGL 3445 - A Survey of Canadian Literature
ENGL 3456 - Indigenous Literatures in Canada I
ENGL 3465 - American Literature to 1865
ENGL 3485 - Modern and Contemporary American Writers
ENGL 3486 – American Modernism
ENGL 3487 – Contemporary American Literature
ENGL 3496 - Core Seminar Group 4
ENGL 3507 - Writer's Voice
ENGL 3516 - Creative Writing
ENGL 3517 - Studies in Creative Writing
ENGL 3536 - Environmental Communication
ENGL 3546 - Media Representations of Indigenous Peoples in North America
ENGL 3566 - Indigenous Oral Storytelling
ENGL 3576 - The Craft of Life Writing
ENGL 3577 - The Craft of Writing Poetry
ENGL 3596 - Core Seminar (ERMS - English Rhetoric and Media Studies)
ENGL 3826 - Indigenous Film in Canada​
ENGL/FILM 3846 - Applied Media Aesthetics
ENGL/FILM 3847 - Film Theory
ENGL 4105 - Theory and Criticism
ENGL 4656 - Directed Readings
ENGL 4686 - Honours Seminar I
ENGL 4687 - Honours Seminar II
ENGL 4695 - Honours Research Paper
ENGL 4786 - Honours Seminar III
ENGL 4787 - Honours Seminar IV

ENGL 1511 - Academic Reading & Writing in English for Aboriginals I 

This course for Aboriginal students is intended to develop academic reading and writing skills including active and critical reading, critical thinking, writing in a variety of academic forms, research, and oral presentations. The teachings of the Seven Grandfathers guide the learning environment as well as workshops and individual conferences. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 1512 - Academic Reading & Writing in English for Aboriginals II

This course for Aboriginal students augments the fundamental skills taught in ENGL 1511 including research practices, reporting, and argumentative writing. PREREQ: ENGL 1511 or permission of the instructor. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 1540 - Academic Reading and Writing for Native English Speakers

​This course explores the relationship between reading and writing at a basic academic level. The course helps students to develop skills essential to essay writing and critical reading. Some emphasis is also placed on practical exercises in diction, grammar and idioms. This course is designed to meet the needs of English-speaking students who require further preparation for university-level reading and writing. In the first week of classes, students will be required to demonstrate an appropriate level of competency in reading and writing English. This course does not count for credit in an English concentration, specialization, major, or minor but may be used as an elective. (sem 3) cr 6. Students cannot retain credits for ENGL 1540, 1550 and 1511.

ENGL 1550 - Academic Reading and Writing for Non-native English Speakers

​Designed to meet the needs of students whose first language is not English, this course explores the relationship between reading and writing at a basic academic level. The course helps students to develop skills essential to essay-writing and critical reading. Some emphasis is also placed on practical exercises in diction, grammar and idioms. In the first week of classes, students will be required to demonstrate an appropriate level of competency in reading and writing English. This course does not count for credit in an English concentration, specialization, major, or minor but may be used as an elective. (sem 3) cr 6. Students cannot retain credit for both ENGL 1550 and ENGL 1540.

ENGL 1705 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies

This course introduces students to a range of literary and rhetorical genres: fiction, poetry, drama, non-fictional prose, film, and public discourse. The course develops students' critical reading and writing abilities. Focusing on the principles of argumentation, exposition, and writing process, the course actively engages in writing workshops, developing students' proficiencies in peer-editing, essay writing, as well as research paper preparation and presentation. (sem 3) cr 6. Student cannot retain credit for both ENGL 1705 and ENGL 1706 or ENGL 1707.

ENGL 1706 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies I

This course introduces students to a range of literary and rhetorical genres of poetry, drama, and non-fictional discourse. The course develops students' critical reading and writing abilities with a focus on the principles of argumentation, exposition, and writing process. The course actively engages students in writing workshops, developing students' proficiencies in peer-editing, writing process, and essay writing. (sem 3) cr 3 Note: students may not retain credit for both ENGL 1706 and ENGL 1705.

ENGL-1707 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies II

A continuation of ENGL 1706, this course addresses a range of literary and rhetorical genres in fiction and film. The course further develops critical reading and writing abilities with a focus on the principles of argumentation, exposition, and writing process. The course actively engages students in writing workshops, further developing students' proficiencies in peer editing, essay writing, and research paper preparation and presentation. (sem 3) cr 3 Pre-requisite: ENGL 1706. Note: students may not retain credit for both ENGL 1707 and ENGL 1705.

ENGL 2005 - Literatures in English

This course provides a historical and geographical survey of literatures in English, intended as a foundation for students majoring in English Literature. (lec 3) cr 6.

ENGL 2016 - Science Writing in the Public Sphere

This course investigates how scientific concepts, methods, and findings are communicated in the public sphere and examines selected genres and contexts of science writing for non-specialist audiences. Prerequisite: 18 credits of university courses (Lec 3, 3 cr)

ENGL 2116 - The Bible and Literature

This course is a study of the Bible’s influence on English literature, with emphasis on symbolism, myth and narrative. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 2116 and 2115. (sem 3) cr 3

ENGL/FILM 2105 - World Cinema

A study of a body of film chosen to represent the range and variety of work in major film-producing countries (other than the U.S.) With emphasis on developments since 1945. (lec 4) cr 6.

ENGL/FILM 2205 - American Film Directors

A selection of the works of a number (normally about six) of directors from the United States will be studied. Prerequisite: a previous film course. (lec 4) cr 6.

ENGL 2527 - Rhetorical Criticism

This course will examine the fragmentation of Rhetoric as a discipline in the 19 th century through an investigation of social, political and historical forces. The course will also explore the resurgence of Rhetoric as a discipline during the last two decades. Prerequisite: ENGL 2526. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 2546 - Rhetorical Principles

This course introduces the foundational principles of rhetorical theory and practice as developed by writers and teachers in Ancient Greece and Rome. The course explores the relevance of classical rhetoric to the contemporary study and practice of persuasive communication. (lec/sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 2626 - Critical Approaches

This course is an introductory study of critical theory as practised in the areas of literature, drama, rhetoric and film. Applying selected theories to a variety of texts enhances students' understanding of critical approaches. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 2626 and ENGL 2326.

ENGL 2636 - Detective Fiction

Course description coming soon.

ENGL 2637 - Children's Literature

This course examines a selection of the literature in English produced for or appropriated by children and young adults. Genres may include picture books, poetry, and novels. (lec 3) cr 3.

ENGL 2656 - Northern Ontario Literature

This course is a study of major writings about Northern Ontario including many by northerners. Themes include regionalism, outsiders and outlaws, Native people, landscape and land-space, etc. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 2656 and ENGL 2456.

ENGL 2666 - Literature and the Environment

This course investigates literary engagements with the environment using the framework of ecocriticism. The course analyses a range of texts in light of key ecocritical concepts, methods, and themes. (Lec 3) 3 cr. Prerequisite 18 university credits

ENGL 2676 - Popular Literature and Culture I

This course is a study of popular literatures and cultures, which may involve one of the following: science fiction, gothic or children's literature. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 2676 and ENGL 3676.

ENGL 2677 - Popular Literature and Culture II

This course is a study of popular literatures and cultures, which may involve one of the following: science fiction, gothic or children's literature. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 2677 and ENGL 3677.

ENGL 2815 - World Cinema

TBA

ENGL 2827 - Documentary Film Making

This course is an intensive documentary film production seminar. Students will be divided into groups to create short but sophisticated documentary films. Ten comprehensive weekly workshops will be given during the term to explore stylistic and technical topics, such as narrative structure, time manipulation, filming interviews, montage principles, script writing and treatments. PREREQ: ENGL/FILM 2826 or permission of the instructor. (sem 4) cr 3. Crosslisted with FILM 2827.

ENGL 2826 - Rhetoric of Documentary Films

Through studying a variety of critically acclaimed documentary films, this course will develop students' understanding of the rhetorical dimensions of documentory films and prepare them for documentary filmmaking and media journalism. The course will engage students in a critical exploration of the rhetoric of documentary films by examining issues such as image icons and ideology, narrative and discourse, voices and authority, audience and rhetorical situation. Course assignments will include rhetorical criticism of documentary films as well as research and proposal writing for a short documentary film. (lec 4) cr 3. Crosslisted with ENGL 2826.

ENGL 2827 - Documentary Film Making

This course is an intensive documentary film production seminar. Students will be divided into groups to create short but sophisticated documentary films. Ten comprehensive weekly workshops will be given during the term to explore stylistic and technical topics, such as narrative structure, time manipulation, filming interviews, montage principles, script writing and treatments. PREREQ: ENGL/FILM 2826 or permission of the instructor. (sem 4) cr 3. Crosslisted with ENGL 2827.

ENGL 2846 - Rhetoric of Film and Image

This course provides the foundation for rhetorical analysis and composition of motion picture arts and visual texts through careful examination of selected films and/or other visual media. Topics may include power dynamics, cinesonica, symbolism, etc. (lec/sem 4) cr 3. Cross-listed with FILM 2846.

ENGL 3105 - 16th and 17th Century Poetry and Prose

This course will examine a variety of Tudor, Stuart, and Civil War texts in poetry and prose, as well as the contexts for their production. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3105 and ENGL 2045.

ENGL 3106 – Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose

This course investigates texts in a variety of genres of poetry and prose in the period 1485 to 1603. Attention is given to the conventions of different genres and the ways texts contribute and respond to social, political, religious, and economic changes during the Tudor period. Visual materials from or about the period will also be examined. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3105 and ENGL 3106.

ENGL 3107 – Seventeenth-Century Poetry and Prose

This course investigates texts in a variety of genres of poetry and prose in the period 1604-1660. Attention is given to the conventions of different genres and the ways texts contribute and respond to social, political, religious, and economic changes during the Stuart period. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3105 and ENGL 3107.

ENGL 3125 - Shakespeare

This course focuses on approximately 15 of the dramatist's plays. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3125 and ENGL 2535.

ENGL 3126 – Introduction to Shakespeare

This course investigates a selection of Shakespeare’s plays and poems, examining these works in terms of genre, dramatic and verse conventions, rhetorical construction, and poetic form. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3125 and ENGL 3126.

ENGL 3127 – Shakespeare in Context

This course investigates a selection of Shakespeare’s plays, addressing the texts’ engagement with their historical, social, and cultural contexts. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Completion of ENGL 3126 is recommended before registering in this course. Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3125 and ENGL 3127.

ENGL 3157 - Women's Writing in the 16th and 17th Century

This course considers literary and cultural concerns of women's writing from the 16th through the mid-17th centuries in both manuscript and print. It examines the many modes in which women write; constructions of literary tradition and authority; responses to early modern gender ideology and theories of women's education; and relations among gender, sexuality and economics. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3157 and either ENGL 3737 or ENGL 3747.

ENGL 3175 - Medieval and Early Modern Drama

This course is a study of miracle plays, morality plays, interludes and Tudor and Stuart tragedy, comedy and romance. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3175 and ENGL 2465.

ENGL 3195 - Selected Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature

This course is an extended treatment of a selected topic in medieval or renaissance literature written in English. The specific topic of the course may change from year to year. (lec 3) cr 6.

ENGL 3196 - Core Seminar Group 1

This core seminar will focus on a specific topic of study in Medieval and Renaissance literature. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3206 - The 18th Century English Novel

This course is a study of the rise of the novel in Britain from its beginning in the late 17th and early 18th century to the end of the century, covering the development of the novel as a genre from Defoe to Austen. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3206 and ENGL 2406.

ENGL-3215EL - English Literature of the Romantic Period

The emphasis of this course is on the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3215 and ENGL 3115.

ENGL 3235 - Victorian Literature

This course is a study of prose and poetry from Carlyle to Hopkins. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3235 and ENGL 3135.

ENGL 3246 – Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature

This course investigates the literature of England, Scotland, and Ireland from the close of England’s Civil War to the mid-eighteenth century. Readings include Restoration drama as well as prose and poetry engaging with the socio-political issues of the period and experiments in early fiction. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3245 and ENGL 3246.

ENGL 3247 – Literature of Sensibility and Revolution

This course investigates the literature of Great Britain, Ireland, and North America in the later eighteenth/early nineteenth century. Readings include prose and poetry engaging with the socio-political issues of the period including the Enlightenment, Indigenous and colonial North America, and the emerging novel. (Lec 3; 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3245 and ENGL 3247.

ENGL 3256 - Women of Letters in the 18th Century

This course is a study of the emergence of professional women writers in the 18th century, with emphasis on their works, the conditions of the literary marketplace and their relationship to it. Representative works are examined in detail. (sem 3) cr 3. This course may be applied to a concentration in Women's Studies. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3256 and ENGL 3706.

ENGL 3296 - Core Seminar Group 2

This core seminar will focus on a specific topic of study in 18th and 19th century literature. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3305 - Postcolonial Literary Studies

This course situates English literature in its colonial and postcolonial contexts. The course introduces the history and theory of postcolonial approaches and examines various literary representations of colonial and postcolonial societies. (lec 3) cr 6.

ENGL 3326 - The Modern Novel

This course is a study of the principal novels in English from the late nineteenth century to approximately World War II. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3326 and ENGL 3426.

ENGL 3327 - The Contemporary Novel

This course is a study of the principal novels in English from approximately World War II to the present. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3327 and ENGL 3427.

ENGL 3335 - Modern and Contemporary Poetry

This course is a study of major developments in poetry in English from the late nineteenth century to the present. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3335 and ENGL 3435.

ENGL 3346 - Modern Women's Writing

This course examines a selection of works by women, containing significant commentary on the status and experience of women including such issues as race, class and sexual preference, from 1900 to about 1950. Works are drawn primarily from British and North American literature, as well as from other emerging English literatures. (sem 3) cr 3. This course may be applied to a concentration in Women's Studies. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3346 and ENGL 3726.

ENGL 3347 - Contemporary Women's Writing

This course examines a selection of works by women, containing significant commentary on the status and experience of women including such issues as race, class and sexual preference, from about 1950 to the present. Works are drawn primarily from British and North American literature, as well as from other emerging English literatures. (sem 3) cr 3. This course may be applied to a concentration in Women's Studies. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3347 and ENGL 3727.

ENGL 3396 - Core Seminar Group 3

This core seminar will focus on a specific topic of study in 20th century literature. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3411 – Canadian Indigenous Poetics

This course examines Indigenous poetics in Canada as literary practice and artistic expression. By focusing on the written works of Indigenous poets, this course investigates the poetics of space and embodiment, classical Indigenous poetry, the poetics of memory and place, and Indigenous oralities. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits.

E​NGL 3416 - American Thought and Culture

Through the examination of representative texts, this course treats influential movements and diverse currents in the culture of the US . Creative and critical/theoretical works will be studied. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3445 - A Survey of Canadian Literature

This course is a study of fiction, poetry, drama and criticism from the 19th and 20th centuries. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3445 and ENGL 2255.

ENGL 3456 - Indigenous Literatures in Canada I

This course examines the diverse body of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit literatures from the northern half of Turtle Island in the land now claimed by Canada. It focuses on contemporary plays, novels, poetry, short stories, and orature to analyze the ways in which writers explore possibilities for empowerment, social justice, and reconciliation. (lec 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3465 - American Literature to 1865

This course is a survey of American literature from its beginnings in the colonial period through to 1865. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3465 and ENGL 3365.

ENGL 3485 - Modern and Contemporary American Writers

This course is a study of works representative of the American literary tradition from the late 19th century to the present. (sem 3) cr 6. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3485 and ENGL 3375.

ENGL 3486 – American Modernism

This course investigates the major writers and movements in American literature from the first half of the twentieth century. It examines Realism, Naturalism, and the development of the methods and practices of Modernism. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3485 and ENGL 3486.

ENGL 3487 – Contemporary American Literature

This course considers the major developments in American literature from the mid-twentieth century to the present. lThe course explores major texts and movements, including the rejection of High Modernism, the rise of minority writers, and the development of postmodernism. (Lec 3, 3 cr) Prerequisites: 18 university credits. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3485 and ENGL 3487.

This course examines the work of writers who have succeeded in more than one genre or voice. The focus of study is on how writers create distinctive voices through, for example, tone, figurative language, diction, syntax, theme, sense of audience, point of view. Such writers as the following may be included: Mary Wroth, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, Vladimir Nabokov, Adrienne Rich, Tomson Highway, Anne-Marie MacDonald. (sem 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL 3507 and ENGL 3807.

ENGL 3516 - Creative Writing

This course explores imaginative literary expression. Although the course focusses on the work of class members, it also involves examining the works of others. Specific attention is given to editorial procedure, form, techniques and literary devices. Students wishing to register in this course must submit to the department three weeks before classes begin, a selective portfolio of their creative work or an essay demonstrating creative reasons for wishing to take the course. PREREQ: Permission of the department. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3517 - Studies in Creative Writing

A continuation of ENGL 3516 Creative Writing, this course enables students to work in one genre exclusively, with a view to producing a short piece of publishable or near-publishable quality. Discussion of selected published writing in the student's chosen genres will be combined with peer editing sessions. Established writers from within or beyond the university community may be invited to lecture and to assess student manuscripts. Students must submit a writing portfolio to the department before registering for this course. Prerequisite: ENGL 3516 or premission of instructor.

ENGL 3536 - Environmental Communication

​This course explores contemporary environmental communication in the range of contexts and genres. Topics include public and media discourse on environmental issues, environmental policy-making, environmental risk communication, environmental justice and activism, corporate environmentalism and green marketing, and art and environmentalism. The course draws on principles of rhetorical theory to engage in the critical analysis of environmental communication and to develop relevant projects. (lec 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3546 - Media Representations of Indigenous Peoples in North America

This course critically analyzes North American media representations of Indigenous peoples in film, music, visual art, and social media. It examines the persistence and socio-political effects of stereotypes, as well as the creative ways in which Indigenous artists are using media to challenge representational practices and reclaim their identities. (lec 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3566 - Indigenous Oral Storytelling

This course explores imaginative oral and written expression, traditional protocols and artistic practices of indigenous story-telling. This course focuses on the work of students, as well as on selected oral narratives, traditional stories, and literary texts. Specific attention is given to the practice, procedure, and form of traditional oral story-telling techniques. (sem 3, 3 cr).

ENGL 3576 - The Craft of Life Writing

This workshop explores the literary practice of life writing and identity narratives through creative writing assignments, including the creation of a personal memoir chapter. The course analyses the possibilities of the genre, and fosters a critical approach to the craft of writing memoir. Prerequisite: minimum of 18 university credits and ENGL 3516 is recommended. Lec 1; Exp 2; 3 credits.

ENGL 3577 - The Craft of Writing Poetry

This workshop explores poetry—forms, techniques, and traditions—through creative writing assignments, including the creation of individual portfolios. The course analyses the possibilities of the genre, and fosters a critical approach to the craft of writing poetry. Prerequisite: minimum of 18 university credits and ENGL 3516 is recommended. Lec 1; Exp 2; 3 credits

ENGL 3596 - Core Seminar (ERMS - English Rhetoric and Media Studies)

This core seminar will focus on a specific topic of study in Rhetoric and Media Studies. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 3826 - Indigenous Film in Canada

This course critically examines contemporary Indigenous films in Canada and directed by Indigenous peoples. The course considers the aesthetics and representational practices of Indigenous films as they seek to narrate Indigenous subjectivities and epistemologies. The pedagogical and activist impulses of Indigenous filmmaking are analyzed in terms of decolonization and reconciliation.

ENGL/FILM 3846 - Applied Media Aesthetics

​The knowledge of applied aesthetics serves two purposes: first, for film and rhetoric studies, to improve the critical ability to interpret media arts through examining the scientific and artistic principles of different aesthetic fields; second, for media production, to establish students' own creative proficiency by exposing them to various aesthetic possibilities. The course introduces basic technical and aesthetic knowledge for video production and visual design on TV and computer screens: shot planning, screen forces, golden ratio, lighting, editing, etc. PREREQ: ENGL/FILM 2805 or approval of the department. (sem 3) cr 3. Crosslisted with FILM 3846. Students may not retain credit for both ENGL/FILM 3846 and FILM 3206.

ENGL/FILM 3847 - Film Theory

This course introduces the basics of classical film theory, focusing particularly on the discourse between formalism and realism, and the philosophical question of the nature of film art by such authors as Sergei Eisenstein, Siegfied Kracauer, André Bazin, Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage, etc. The second half of the course introduces spectatorship theories in terms of ideology and culture. Pre-requisite: FILM 2005 (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 4105 - Theory and Criticism

Through the analysis of selected topics, students explore a range of theoretical discourses and critical issues relevant to literary, media and rhetorical studies. PREREQ: Minimum 24 credits in English. (lec 3) cr 6.

ENGL 4656 - Directed Readings

Individual instruction in a special field of interest through the discussion of assigned texts. Students choose their topic in consultation with a professor. Normally the course is restricted to 4th-year students. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 4686 - Honours Seminar I

Each seminar is devoted to a special topic proposed by the professor and approved by the department. In all cases, the topic must lie in the professor's field of specialization. PREREQ: Minimum 24 credits in English or department approval. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 4687 - Honours Seminar II

Each seminar is devoted to a special topic proposed by the professor and approved by the department. In all cases, the topic must lie in the professor's field of specialization. PREREQ: Minimum 24 credits in English or department approval. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 4695 - Honours Research Paper

This course consists of a supervised research project leading to a paper of approximately 10,000 words. Permission of the Department required. (tut 3) cr 6.

ENGL 4786 - Honours Seminar III

Each seminar is devoted to a special topic proposed by the professor and approved by the department. In all cases, the topic must lie in the professor's field of specialization. PREREQ: Minimum 24 credits in English or department approval. (sem 3) cr 3.

ENGL 4787 - Honours Seminar IV

Each seminar is devoted to a special topic proposed by the professor and approved by the department. In all cases, the topic must lie in the professor's field of specialization. PREREQ: Minimum 24 credits in English or department approval. (sem 3) cr 3.

 

 

Course Categories

 

First Year Courses

ENGL 1511 - Academic Reading and Writing in English for Aboriginal Students I
ENGL 1512 - Academic Reading and Writing in English for Aboriginal Students II
ENGL 1540 - Academic Reading and Writing for Native English Speakers
ENGL 1550 - Academic Reading and Writing for Non-Native English Speakers
ENGL 1705 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies
ENGL 1706 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies I
ENGL 1707 - Introduction to Writing and English Studies II

 

ELIT Core Course

ENGL 2005 - Literatures in English

 

Group One

ENGL 3105 - 16th and 17th Century Poetry and Prose
ENGL 3106 - Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose
ENGL 3107 - Seventeenth-Century Poetry and Prose
ENGL 3125 - Shakespeare
ENGL 3126 - Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 3127 - Shakespeare in Context
ENGL 3145 - Medieval Poetry and Prose
ENGL 3157 - 16th and 17th Century Women's Writing
ENGL 3175 - Medieval and Early Modern Drama
ENGL 3195 - Selected Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
ENGL 3196 - Core Seminar Group 1

 

Group Two

ENGL 3206 - The 18th Century English Novel
ENGL 3207 - The 19th Century English Novel
ENGL 3215 - English Literature of the Romantic Period
ENGL 3235 - Victorian Literature
ENGL 3246 - Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENGL 3247 - Literature of Sensibility and Revolution
ENGL 3256 - Women of Letters in the 18th Century
ENGL 3257 - 19th Century Women's Writing
ENGL 3295 - Special Topics in 18th and 19th Century Literature
ENGL 3296 - Core Seminar Group 2

 

Group Three

ENGL 3305 - Postcolonial Literary Studies
ENGL 3316 - Modern Drama
ENGL 3317 - Contemporary Drama
ENGL 3326 - The Modern Novel
ENGL 3327 - The Contemporary Novel
ENGL 3335 - Modern and Contemporary Poetry
ENGL 3346 - Modern Women's Writing
ENGL 3347 - Contemporary Women's Writing
ENGL 3395 - Special Topics in Modern and Contemporary Literature
ENGL 3396 - Core Seminar Group 3

 

Group Four

ENGL 3405 - Canadian Thought and Culture
ENGL 3411 - Canadian Indigenous Poetics
ENGL 3416 - American Thought and Culture
ENGL 3445 - A Survey of Canadian Literature
ENGL 3456 - Indigenous Literatures in Canada I
ENGL 3465 - American Literature to 1865
ENGL 3485 - Modern and Contemporary American Writers
ENGL 3486 - American Modernism
ENGL 3487 - Contemporary American Literature
ENGL 3495 - Special Topics in North American Literature
ENGL 3496 - Core Seminar Group 4

 

Fourth Year Courses

ENGL 4105 - Theory and Criticism
ENGL 4656 - Directed Readings 
ENGL 4686 - Honours Seminar I
ENGL 4687 - Honours Seminar II
ENGL 4695 - Honours Research Paper
ENGL 4786 - Honours Seminar III
ENGL 4787 - Honours Seminar IV

 

Other ENGL Courses 

ENGL 2116 - The Bible and Literature
ENGL 2636 - Detective Fiction
ENGL 2637 - Children's Literature
​ENGL 2656 - Northern Ontario Literature
ENGL 2666 - Literature and the Environment
ENGL 2676 - Popular Literature and Culture I
ENGL 2677 - Popular Literature and Culture II

 

ELIT Electives in Other Departments:

ANCS 3016 - Xenophon and Greek Historiography
MUSC 2046 - Soundtracks: Music in Movies
RLST 2336 - Religious Themes in Literature I    
RLST 2337 - Religious Themes in Literature II
RLST 2365 - Religion in Film
THEA 2246 - Theatre History I    
THEA 2247 - Theatre History II
THEA 3246 - Theatre History III
THEA 3247 - Theatre History IV
THEA 3357 - Canadian Theatre

 

ERMS Courses and Electives

ENGL 2016 - Science Writing in the Public Sphere
ENGL/FILM 2105 - World Cinema
ENGL/FILM 2205 - American Film Directors
ENGL 2515 - Composition and Rhetorical Theory
ENGL 2527 - Rhetorical Criticism
ENGL 2546 - Rhetorical Principles
ENGL 2626 - Critical Approaches
ENGL 2646 - The Study and Evolution of the English Language
ENGL 2826 - Rhetoric of Documentary Films
ENGL 2827 - Documentary Film Making
ENGL 2846 - Rhetoric of Film and Image
ENGL 3157 - 16th and 17th Century Women's Writing
ENGL 3256 - Women of Letters in the 18th Century
ENGL 3257 - 19th Century Women's Writing
ENGL 3405 - Canadian Thought and Culture
ENGL 3416 - American Thought and Culture
ENGL 3507 - Writer's Voice
ENGL 3516 - Creative Writing
ENGL 3517 - Studies in Creative Writing
ENGL 3536 - Environmental Communication
ENGL 3546 - Media Representations of Indigenous Peoples in North America
ENGL 3556 - Principles and Practices of Workplace Communication
ENGL 3566 - Indigenous Oral Storytelling
ENGL 3576 - The Craft of Life Writing
ENGL 3577 - The Craft of Writing Poetry
ENGL 3595 - Special Topics in Rhetoric and Media Studies
ENGL 3596 - Core Seminar (ERMS - English Rhetoric and Media Studies)
ENGL/FILM 3836 - Women and Film
ENGL/FILM 3846 - Applied Media Aesthetics
​ENGL/FILM 3847 - Film Theory

 

ERMS Electives in Other Departments (max. 12 credits):

ESPA 3226 - Film in Spain and Latin America
HIST 3916 - Propaganda, Politics and Film
HIST 3917 - Fascism on Film
MUSC 2046 - Soundtracks: Music in the Movies
ITAL 3216 - Italian Cinema
PHIL 2505 - Critical Thinking and Argument
PHIL 2716 - Philosophy and Film
PHIL 2746 - Communications Media and Values
POLI 3466 - Politics and Film
RLST 2365 - Religion in Film
WOMN 2106 - Representations of Women & Gender in the News Media
WOMN 3326 - Girl Cultures